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i am dedicated to funny people, fine noses, and furry creatures of all stripes. current roles: student, patient, sadsack video game addict, honorary belcher.

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funquisitor:

*writes back to dalish clan* check out this mess holy shit

· ow ·

Help please / Came out at trans, didn’t go well. [money problem]

lapaduza:

Here the thing. After I started a therapy one month ago, i finally started talking to my mom about me, and finally say to her that i’m a trans ftm. 

It didn’t go well. So, as she says, she had to keep her engagement to pay my studies, because i’m still her “daughter”, but nothing more. 

I’m in real need of money here.

I’m willing to draw any type of commission for any price you see fit. Anything.

You can check my art blog here 

and exemple of regular commissions here

You can contact me by ask or by email : lapaduza@gmail.com

Please, spray the word. 
Thank you in advance.

· bat · adorable ·

yamisnuffles:

I failed but at least I tried.

yamisnuffles:

This latest replay with Reilli is a real look at you life, look at your choices kind of playthrough.

Kira: Too bad the Jedi Mind Trick doesn’t work on other Jedi.
Kira: And this is why raising Jedi in temples is a bad idea.
Kira: I should see if I can get him to turn around, just to remind her what’s going on with his face.
Kira: *long suffering sigh*

greywardentabris:

Do you ever think about mage children in the Circle trying to stay awake all night because they’re afraid demons will possess them if they fall asleep?

momochanners:

A dream to be shared

alldragonageconfessions:

Both Cullen and Anders are characters who have in retconned (and bent time and space) to appear in DA2 because they have a large and loud fanbase. And now with Cullen’s appearance in DA:I. Mike Laidlaw’s comment about almost being able to hear the fangirls squee when Cullen was showed in the latest Twitch stream was proof of that. I have no problem with Cullen, but I think its ridiculous how fans refuse to admit that his appearance in DA:I is pure fanservice.

Anders’ fanbase was hardly “large and loud”. He was just a popular character (and given how much foreshadowing is in Awakening, I find it difficult to believe BW didn’t have plans for him before Awakening was even released). 

As for Cullen, he wasn’t even a love interest until BW was given an extra year of dev time for DAI. They were quite prepared to have him in the game, but not available for romance. That tells me that “servicing” his fans was fairly low on their priorities. 

Just because they acknowledge how popular a character is doesn’t mean their inclusion is solely to appease a certain population. Also, these criticisms seem to only pop up when something comes out that isn’t for white straight men. Cullen is fanservice, GLBT characters and love interests are fanservice, showing female and non-human inquisitors is fanservice. It’s a loaded word that gets trotted out to minimize the importance of anything the user deems frivolous or unimportant, regardless of how fucking ridiculous it is to pick out any element of a game made for fans to enjoy and slam it for…being enjoyed by fans. 

letterstomycountry:

Via A Mighty Girl:

Professional hacker Parisa Tabriz is responsible for keeping the nearly billion users of Google Chrome safe by finding vulnerabilities in their system before malicious hackers do. Tabriz, a “white hat” hacker who calls herself Google’s “Security Princess”, is head of the company’s information security engineering team. The 31-year-old Polish-Iranian-American is also an anomaly in Silicon Valley according to a recent profile in The Telegraph: “Not only is she a woman – a gender hugely under-represented in the booming tech industry – but she is a boss heading up a mostly male team of 30 experts in the US and Europe.”

Tabriz came up with “Security Princess” while at a conference and the unusual title is printed on her business card. “I knew I’d have to hand out my card and I thought Information Security Engineer sounded so boring,” she says. “Guys in the industry all take it so seriously, so security princess felt suitably whimsical.” Her curiosity, mischievousness, and innovative thinking are all assets in her business: a high-profile company like Google is constantly in the crosshairs of so-called “black hat” hackers.

Tabriz came into internet security almost by accident; at the University of Illinois’ computer engineering program, her interest was first whetted by the story of early hacker John Draper, who became known as Captain Crunch in the 1960s after he learned how to make free long-distance calls using a toy whistle from a Cap’n Crunch cereal box. She realized that, to beat the hackers of today, she had to be prepared for similar — but more advanced — out-of-the-box thinking.

While women at still very under-represented in the tech industry — Google recently reported that only 30% of its staff is female — Tabriz has hope for the future: “[F]ifty years ago there were similar percentages of women in medicine and law, now thankfully that’s shifted.” And, while she hasn’t encountered overt sexism at Google, when she was offered the position, at least one classmate said, “you know you only got it cos you’re a girl.” To help address this imbalance, she mentors under-16 students at a yearly computer science conference that teaches kids how to “hack for good” — and she especially encourages girls to pursue internet security work. One 16-year-old who attended, Trinity Nordstrom, says, “Parisa is a good role model, because of her I’d like to be a hacker.”

Tabriz, who was named by Forbes as one of the “top 30 under 30 to watch” in 2012, also wants the public to realize that hacking can be used for positive ends. “[H]acking can be ugly,” she says. “The guy who published the private photos of those celebrities online made headlines everywhere. What he did was not only a violation of these women but it was criminal, and as a hacker I was very saddened by it. I feel like we, the hackers, need better PR to show we’re not all like that… [A]fter all I’m in the business of protecting people.”

To read more about Google’s “Security Princess” in The Telegraph, visit http://bit.ly/Z6Z5RG

andthebluestblue:

stop saying “his or her”

use their

piss off prescriptivists
acknowledge nonbinary identities
make your sentences less clunky
advocate for common usage which is what leads to grammatical acceptance 

spicyshimmy:

cassandra pentaghast is so incredible gorgeous strong perfect sexy romantic vulnerable wonderful that even the woman who voices her has a massive crush on her. amazing

yukisamui:

I can’t

viwan themes